• Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami

      This electrifying journey through the public and private worlds of pop culture mega-icon Grace Jones contrasts musical sequences with intimate personal footage, all the while brimming with Jones’s bold aesthetic.

    • Like Me

      A reckless loner (Addison Timlin, Little Sister) sets out on a crime spree that she broadcasts on social media. After releasing a video of herself robbing a convenience store, she amasses a huge following. While traveling along the coast, she encounters a drifter, an Internet troll, and a paint huffing outsider who are all pulled into her circle of chaos, junk food, and drugs. Robert Mockler’s visually arresting debut feature, produced by indie horror veteran Larry Fessenden, takes the viewer into a world of fabricated personalities and offers a thought-provoking portrait of isolation in our increasingly digital world.

    • The Banishment

      Andrey Zvyagintsev (Loveless, Leviathan) proffers an ambitious exploration of the human condition in his second feature. Much like his critically acclaimed debut The Return, the film investigates bonds of family, this time tackling the relationship between a husband and wife. A trip to the pastoral countryside reveals a dark, sinister reality for a family from the city. Eschewing easy answers and tackling a wide array of themes, The Banishment poetically renders the persistent human state of exile from our surroundings. Based on the novel The Laughing Matter by William Saroyan.

    • The Return

      The debut feature of celebrated director Andrey Zvyagintsev (Loveless, Leviathan) earns its place in the pantheon of great Russian Cinema. Winner of the Golden Lion at the Venice International Film Festival, the film is a mixture of psychological thriller and road movie, telling the story of two young brothers who must cope with the sudden and unexplained return of their father after a 12-year absence. The three embark on a road trip that becomes a background for self-discovery and the destruction of deeply rooted emotional investments. Straightforward yet satisfyingly layered, The Return’s combines deep psychological exploration with bold statements about the trials of manhood.

    • Maximillian and Marie de Bourgogne (miniseries)

      Known as ‘The Last Knight’ for his bravery and battle skills, the great European emperor Maximilian and his story is as spectacular as it is familiar: It is the tale of a boy who must become a man. It is the story of a prince who must learn to be king. But above all, it is the struggle of a son who steps out of his father’s shadow with the help of a most unexpected ally: a beautiful woman every bit as headstrong as the prince himself, held hostage by he own people. Her name: Marie de Bourgogne. Marie and Maximilian’s marriage is much more than

    • Winter Sleep

      Directed by the Turkish cinema master, Nuri Bilge Ceylan, this enthralling, brilliantly photographed film won the top prize at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival and was Turkey's entrant in the Oscar Best Foreign Language Film category. Ceylan's Once Upon a Time in Anatolia had shared the top prize at Cannes in 2011. Set in the amazingly picturesque Cappadocia region in central Turkey, the exterior scenes strikingly capture the remarkable topography a World Heritage site while the interior scenes bring Rembrandt to mind. A retired actor has inherited a small hotel where he is ensconced with his recently divorced sister, his much younger and growingly discontented wife. A seemingly trivial incident sets in motion a drama of personalities at odds with each other and the paths their lives have taken. The superb cast of actors quickly takes your attention and won't let it go.

    • Post Mortem

      The second part of director Pablo Larrain's celebrated trilogy about Chile during the dictatorial reign of Augusto Pinochet, POST MORTEM is a "grim, intense, mordantly comic little film" (A.O. Scott, New York Times) about a civil servant transformed by the 1973 military coup.

      Mario (Alfredo Castro, Tony Manero) is an unassuming state employee who transcribes notes during autopsies. Furtive and lonely, he becomes obsessed with his neighbor, the dancehall girl Nancy (Antonia Zegers), who is involved with a group of left-wing activists. With the coup, and the death of President Salvador Allende, Nancy's friends are hunted down, and Mario's hospital becomes clogged with the bodies of dissenters. Soon the violence filters into Mario's psyche, and he begins to break down, much like his country.

      Following the brilliant Tony Manero (2008, available from Kino Lorber), and preceding the recently completed No (2012), Post Mortem is "a new and original vision of political terror" (J. Hoberman, Blouin Art Info) that remains urgently relevant to the repressive regimes of today.

    • Alps

      Alps is a mysterious and moving investigation into the process of mourning, a stunningly original follow-up to director Yorgos Lanthimos' Oscar-nominated debut, DOGTOOTH (2009).

      An oddball group of four people (made up of two hospital employees, a gymnast, and her coach) form a secret society that sets out to ease the grieving process for those whose loved ones have died. For a fee they will act the part of the missing family member, learning their hobbies and eccentricities in order to help the customer accept their loss. As methadone is to heroin addiction, so are the Alps, as they call themselves, to the mourning process. But when the nurse known as Monte Rosa (Aggeliki Papoulia, also in DOGTOOTH) begins to attach too deeply to her subjects, their project spirals out of control into violence and confusion.

      Winner of the Best Screenplay Award at the Venice Film Festival, Alps proves that co-writer and director Lanthimos is one of the most talented and provocative filmmakers working today.

    • Winnebago Man

      Type "The Angriest Man in the World" into any search engine, and one name appears -- Jack Rebney, a.k.a. "The Winnebago Man" -- an '80s RV salesman, whose hilarious, profanity-strewn, on-the-job meltdown was captured on video and passed around on VHS tapes, before exploding into an Internet phenomenon seen by millions. When a young filmmaker sets out on the seemingly impossible task of tracking down Rebney, who disappeared 20 years before, he finds Rebney living alone on a mountain top, as sharp-tongued as ever, but more intelligent and loveable than anyone could have imagined. WINNEBAGO MAN is an outrageously funny look at viral culture and an unexpectedly moving tale of one man's response to unintended celebrity.
      Directed by Ben Steinbauer

    • Dawson City: Frozen in Time

      This meditation on cinema’s past from Decasia director Bill Morrison pieces together the bizarre true history of a long-lost collection of 533 nitrate film prints from the early 1900s. Located just south of the Arctic Circle, Dawson City was settled in 1896 and became the center of the Canadian Gold Rush that brought 100,000 prospectors to the area. It was also the final stop for a distribution chain that sent prints and newsreels to the Yukon. The films were seldom, if ever, returned. The now-famous Dawson City Collection was uncovered in 1978 when a bulldozer working its way through a parking lot dug up a horde of film cans. Morrison draws on these permafrost-protected, rare silent films and newsreels, pairing them with archival footage, interviews, historical photographs, and an enigmatic score by Sigur Rós collaborator and composer Alex Somers. Dawson City: Frozen Time depicts the unique history of this Canadian Gold Rush town by chronicling the life cycle of a singular film collection through its exile, burial, rediscovery, and salvation.

      Directed by Bill Morrison
      Writer Bill Morrison
      Editor Bill Morrison
      Cinematographer Bill Morrison
      Produced by Madeleine Molyneaux and Bill Morrison
      Composed by Alex Somers
      Sound John Somers

    • It Felt Like Love

      In this unflinchingly honest and refreshingly unsentimental coming-of-age story, 14-year-old Lila (Gina Piersanti, in a remarkable debut) spends a languid South Brooklyn summer playing third wheel to her promiscuous friend Chiara and Chiara's boyfriend Patrick. Eager for her own sexual awakening, Lila gamely decides to pursue the older, thuggish Sammy, rumored to sleep with anyone. But as Lila's overt advances unmask her inexperience and quiet desperation, she is quickly pushed into frightening and unwelcome new territory.

    • Harvard Beats Yale 29-29

      An incredible true story that unfolds like "a ripping good yarn... with an uproarious, impossible Hollywood ending" (Andrew O'Hehir, Salon.com), Harvard Beats Yale 29-29 is filmmaker Kevin Rafferty's (The Atomic Cafe) acclaimed documentary depicting one of the most legendary games in the history of sports.

    • Sidewalk Stories

      A young artist living in New York, on the fringes of the financial district and its rushing crowds, tries to make a living sketching passers-by on the street. He survives on his meager means and has found refuge in an abandoned building. One night, on the corner of a back alley, he finds a little girl whose father has just been murdered. While struggling to take care of her, he meets a young rich woman who immediately falls in love with this awkward couple.

    • Hitler's Hollywood

      Filmmaker Rüdiger Suchsland suggests that the Third Reich was essentially an immersive movie starring the German nation, produced and directed by Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels. Hitler’s Hollywood collages key films from the more than 1000 features the Nazis produced from 1933-1945: musicals, melodramas, romances, costume dramas, war films – and when the real war got tough, insanely lavish, over-the-top fantasies.

    • Who is Dayani Cristal?

      The body of an unidentified immigrant is found in the Arizona Desert. In an attempt to retrace his path and discover his story, director Marc Silver and Gael Garcia Bernal embed themselves among migrant travelers on their own mission to cross the border, providing rare insight into the human stories which are so often ignored in the immigration debate.

    • Manuscripts Don't Burn

      Clandestinely produced in disavowal of a 20-year filmmaking ban passed down by the Iranian authorities, the scathing Manuscripts Don't Burn brings a whole new level of clarity and audacity to Mohommad Rasoulof's already laudable career. Drawing from the true story of the government's attempted 1995 murder of several prominent writers and intellectuals, Rasoulof imagines a repressive regime so pervasive that even the morally righteous are subsumed or cast aside. A lacerating and slow-burning thriller filmed in a frigid palate of blues and greys, Manuscripts Don't Burn is perhaps the most subversive and incendiary j'accuse lodged against an authoritarian regime since the fall of the Soviet Union.

    • Computer Chess

      Set over the course of a weekend tournament for chess software programmers thirty-some years ago, COMPUTER CHESS transports viewers to a nostalgic moment when the contest between technology and the human spirit seemed a little more up for grabs. We get to know the eccentric geniuses possessed of the vision to teach a metal box to defeat man, literally, at his own game, laying the groundwork for artificial intelligence as we know it and will come to know it in the future.

    • Deceptive Practice: The Mysteries and Mentors of Ricky Jay

      Ricky Jay is a world-renowned magician, author, historian and actor (often a mischievous presence in the films of David Mamet and Paul Thomas Anderson) -- and a performer who regularly provokes astonishment from even the most jaded audiences. DECEPTIVE PRACTICE traces Jay's achievements and influences, from his apprenticeship at age 4 with his grandfather, to such now-forgotten legends as Al Flosso, Slydini, Cardini and his primary mentors, Dai Vernon and Charlie Miller. Featuring rare footage from his 1970s TV appearances (doing 3-card Monte with Steve Martin on The Dinah Shore Show) and told in Jay's inimitable voice, this is a remarkable journey inside the secretive world of magic and the small circle of eccentrics who are its perpetual devotees.

    • Gerhard Richter Painting

      GERHARD RICHTER PAINTING offers unprecedented insight into the life and work of one of the greatest artists of our time, and is a "gorgeously rendered work of art" (Variety) in its own right.

      Legendary German painter Gerhard Richter granted filmmaker Corinna Belz access to his studio in the spring and summer of 2009, where he was working on a series of large abstract paintings. In quiet, highly concentrated images, the documentary provides a fly-on-the-wall perspective of the very personal, tension-filled process of artistic creation. Richter is his own worst critic, destroying multiple canvases before his remarkable creative spirit takes hold, and the astonishing final compositions emerge.

      "Painting is another form of thinking," Richter once said, and GERHARD RICHTER PAINTING takes that premise seriously, exposing for the first time how he translates his thoughts onto a blank canvas. Beautifully shot and endlessly revealing, it "artfully and convincingly immerses us into the world of one of the greatest [painters], painting." (Village Voice)

    • Down Down the Deep River

      Down Down The Deep River marks the directorial debut of Will Sheff, lead singer and songwriter for Okkervil River. Shot in Sheff’s hometown over one year with local non-actors, the dreamy, dialogue-free short film is a story of childhood, imagination, alienation, and loss as two young boys form a friendship and spur the unfolding strange events in 1980s small town New Hampshire.

      Impeccable art direction brings magic to nostalgic, dreamlike, fictionalized representations of Sheff’s own childhood memories, filtering them through the aesthetics of the cornerstone children’s fantasy films of the era — E.T., Explorers, and The Goonies to name a few.

      Sheff scored the film to a musical landscape drawn from his band’s song “Down Down the Deep River” from their 2013 album The Silver Gymnasium.

    • Porto

      Jake (Anton Yelchin) and Mati (Lucie Lucas) are two expats who experience a brief but intimate connection in the ancient Portuguese city of Porto. He's an American loner exiled from his family. She’s a student from France embroiled in an affair with one of her professors. After spotting each other from a distance at an archeological site and then again at a train station and a café, Jake works up the courage to approach Mati and they embark on a night of carefree intimacy. This romantic encounter is viewed from years later, both characters still haunted by the powerful connection they shared. Using a mix of film stocks and art direction that evokes a bygone era of European cinema, Porto delivers a cinematic form of saudade – a Portuguese word that describes an emotional state of nostalgic longing for a person or place that one has loved.

    • The Forbidden Room

      THE FORBIDDEN ROOM is Guy Maddin's ultimate epic phantasmagoria. Honoring classic cinema while electrocuting it with energy, this Russian nesting doll of a film begins (after a prologue on how to take a bath) with the crew of a doomed submarine chewing flapjacks in a desperate attempt to breathe the oxygen within. Suddenly, impossibly, a lost woodsman wanders into their company and tells his tale of escaping from a fearsome clan of cave dwellers. From here, Maddin and co-director Evan Johnson take us high into the air, around the world, and into dreamscapes, spinning tales of amnesia, captivity, deception and murder, skeleton women and vampire bananas. Playing like some glorious meeting between Italo Calvino, Sergei Eisenstein and a perverted six year-old child, THE FORBIDDEN ROOM is Maddin's grand ode to lost cinema. Created with the help of master poet John Ashbery, the film features Mathieu Amalric, Udo Kier, Charlotte Rampling, Geraldine Chaplin, Roy Dupuis, Clara Furey, Louis Negin, Maria de Medeiros, Jacques Nolot, Adele Haenel, Amira Casar and Elina Lowensohn as a cavalcade of misfits, thieves and lovers, all joined in the joyful delirium of the kaleidoscopic viewing experience.

    • Oldboy

      After being kidnapped and imprisoned for 15 years, Oh Dae-Su is released, only to find that he must find his captor in 5 days.

    • Romanzo Criminale (Complete Series)

      A criminal known as Lebanese has a dream: to conquer the underworld of Rome. To carry out this feat without precedent he puts together a ruthless and highly organized gang. Their progress and changes in leadership (Lebanese is followed by his cohorts Freddo and Dandi) take place over twenty-five years, from the 1970's into the '90's, and are inseparably intertwined with the dark history of modern Italy: terrorism, kidnappings and corruption at the highest levels of government. Throughout these years Police Lieutenant Scialoia sticks to the gang's trail, trying both to bring them to justice and to win the heart of Dandi's girlfriend Patrizia.

    • Dead Weight

      Charlie Russell passes through the wilderness in the wake of an apocalyptic viral outbreak to reunite with his girlfriend, Samantha. As Charlie's journey brings him closer to his destination of Wausau, WI, he must face physical exhaustion, malicious survivors, and perhaps most menacing, his own emotional burdens. With his newfound traveling companions Charlie must attempt to break his obsessions with the past. He must learn to let it go.

    • Bethlehem

      Bethlehem tells the story of the complex relationship between an Israeli Secret Service officer and his teenage Palestinian informant. Shuttling back and forth between conflicting points of view, the film is a raw portrayal of characters torn apart by competing loyalties and impossible moral dilemmas, giving an unparalleled glimpse into the dark and fascinating world of human intelligence.

    • Dogtooth

      DOGTOOTH is an ingenious dark comedy that won the Prix Un Certain Regard at the 2009 Cannes Film Festival, propelling Yorgos Lanthimos to the forefront of contemporary cinema's most ambitious young filmmakers.

    • Burning Bush (Miniseries)

      Acclaimed director Agnieszka Holland (Europa, Europa) returns to a pivotal time in modern Czech history: the shocking act of a student of the Charles University's Faculty of Arts, who in protest of the Soviet occupation, set himself on fire in Prague's Wenceslas Square on the 16th of January 1969, and died four days later.

    • Omar

      Omar is accustomed to dodging surveillance bullets to cross the separation wall to visit his secret love Nadia. But occupied Palestine knows neither simple love nor clear-cut war. On the other side of the wall, the sensitive young baker Omar becomes a freedom fighter who must face painful choices about life and manhood. When Omar is captured after a deadly act of resistance, he falls into a cat-and-mouse game with the military police. Suspicion and betrayal jeopardize his longtime trust with accomplices and childhood friends Amjad and Tarek, Nadia's militant brother. Omar's feelings quickly become as torn apart as the Palestinian landscape. But it's soon evident that everything he does is for his love of Nadia.

    • Stanley Kubrick's Fear and Desire

      Virtually unseen since its theatrical premiere in 1953, FEAR AND DESIRE was the ambitious first feature film by legendary filmmaker Stanley Kubrick. An existential war film often compared with the director's PATHS OF GLORY (1957) and FULL METAL JACKET (1987), FEAR AND DESIRE follows a squad of soldiers who have crash-landed behind enemy lines and must work their way downriver to rejoin their unit. In the process, they encounter a peasant girl (Virginia Leith) and bind her to a tree, where she is tormented by a mentally unbalanced soldier (future director Paul Mazursky). Before making their escape, the soldiers determine the location of an enemy base and formulate a plot to assassinate its commanding officer.

      The film has been restored at the Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Virginia, from first-generation film elements. Also included on this disc is Kubrick's documentary short THE SEAFARERS, newly preserved by The Museum of Modern Art, with support from The Film Foundation and The Franco-American Cultural Fund.

    • More Than Honey

      Oscar-nominated director Markus Imhoof (The Boat is Full) tackles the vexing issue of why bees, worldwide, are facing extinction. With the tenacity of a man out to solve a world-class mystery, he investigates this global phenomenon, from California to Switzerland, China and Australia. Exquisite macro-photography of the bees (reminiscent of Microcosmos) in flight and in their hives reveals a fascinating, complex world in crisis.

      Writes Eric Kohn in Indiewire: "Imhoof captures the breeding of queen bees in minute detail, ventures to a laboratory to witness a bee brainscan, and discovers the dangerous prospects of a hive facing the infection of mites. In this latter case, the camera's magnifying power renders the infection in sci-fi terms, as if we've stumbled into a discarded scene from David Cronenberg's The Fly." This is a strange and strangely moving film that raises questions of species survival in cosmic as well as apiary terms.

    • You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet

      Based on two works by the playwright Jean Anouilh, YOU AIN'T SEEN NOTHIN' YET opens with a who's-who of French acting royalty (including Mathieu Amalric, Michel Piccoli and frequent Resnais muse Sabine Azema) being summoned to the reading of a late playwright's last will and testament.

      There, the playwright (Denis Podalydes) appears on a TV screen from beyond the grave and asks his erstwhile collaborators to evaluate a recording of an experimental theater company performing his Eurydice--a play they themselves all appeared in over the years. But as the video unspools, instead of watching passively, these seasoned thespians begin acting out the text alongside their youthful avatars, looking back into the past rather like mythic Orpheus himself.

      Gorgeously shot by cinematographer Eric Gautier on stylized sets that recall the French poetic realism of the 1930s, YOU AIN'T SEEN NOTHIN' YET is an alternately wry and wistful valentine to actors and the art of performance from a director long fascinated by the intersection of life, theater and cinema.

    • Sister

      Simon (Kacey Mottet Klein) lives with his older sister (Lea Seydoux) in a housing complex below a luxury Swiss ski resort. With his sister drifting in and out of jobs and relationships, twelve-year-old Simon takes on the responsibility of providing for the two of them. Every day, he takes the lift up to the opulent ski world above, stealing equipment from rich tourists to resell to the local kids down in the valley. He is able to keep their little family afloat with his small-time hustles and his sister is thankful for the money he brings in. But, when Simon partners with a crooked British seasonal worker, he begins to lose his boundaries, affecting his relationship with his sister and plummeting him into dangerous territory.

    • Blood Car

      In the all-too-foreseeable future, gas prices approach $40 a gallon, causing some Americans to abandon their vehicles and others to seek alternate sources of fuel. When a mild-mannered schoolteacher (Mike Brune) invents an experimental engine that thrives on blood, he attracts the attention of two women who vie for his affection: Denise (Katie Rowlett), the proprietress of a butcher stand, and Lorraine (Anna Chlumsky) who runs a rival veggie stand in a grim urban landscape. But Archies need for speed soon surpasses his body's ability to regenerate fluids, so he takes desperate measures to satisfy the Blood Car's thirst. Veering between wicked social satire and outbursts of hardcore gore, BLOOD CAR lives up to its reputation as an "audacious utterly bonkers and downright sick claret-drenched black comedy" Time Out London.

    • Pig

      PIG is a mind-bending sci-fi thriller in the tradition of Mement, "a riveting adventure of confusion and Identity" (Cleveland Plain Dealer).

      A man (Rudolf Martin, NCIS) wakes up alone in the middle of the desert with a black hood on his head and his hands tied behind his back. He has no idea who he is or how he got there. The only clue to his identity- -a piece of paper in his pocket with the name "Manny Elder" written on it--sends him to Los Angeles where things are not what they seem and clues lead to something bigger and more unusual than he could have ever imagined.

      A wildly entertaining shocker that has won festival awards around the world - PIG is a classic in the making.

    • Back in Crime

      When Paris detective Richard Kemp (Jean-Hugues Anglade) is injured in the course of a criminal investigation, he is transported twenty years into the past, and has a second chance at solving the most frustrating mystery of his career: a serial killer known as the Earwig. In pursuing the Earwig, Richard enlists the aid of a beautiful psychologist (Mélanie Thierry), who has doubts about the time-traveler's sanity. But as Richard attempts to rewrite history, the killer's path begins to take unexpected turns, confounding Richard's investigation, and rendering his own future uncertain.

    • The Force

      "Sprawling, immediate, and complex, Peter Nicks’s vérité documentary moves like a pulsing, timely thriller. In 2014, after over a decade of federal monitoring for misconduct and civil rights abuses, the Oakland Police Department hires Chief Sean Whent … in hopes of bridging an historically tense divide between its officers and the community they serve. The Force captures everything; it hovers over Oakland’s evening skies and rides inside speeding police vehicles, granting viewers breathless firsthand access to some of law enforcement’s most dangerous jobs. With fly-on-the-wall intimacy, we see a department trapped in transition, desperate to shed its corrupt image but also challenged by an increasingly organized and urgent Black Lives Matter movement erupting right outside its doorstep." – Harry Vaughn, Sundance Film Festival.

      Directed by Peter Nicks

    • The Retrieval

      On the outskirts of the Civil War, The Retrieval follows a fatherless 13 year-old boy sent north by his bounty hunter gang on a dangerous mission to retrieve a wanted man under false pretense. During their journey towards the unwitting man’s reckoning, the initially distant pair develops unexpected bonds. As his feelings grow, the boy is consumed by conflicting emotions and a gut-wrenching ultimate decision: betray the father figure he’s finally found or risk being killed by his gang for insubordination.

    • A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night

      Strange things are afoot in Bad City. The Iranian ghost town, home to prostitutes, junkies, pimps, and other sordid souls, is a place that reeks of death and hopelessness, where a lonely vampire is stalking the towns most unsavory inhabitants. But when boy meets girl, an unusual love story begins to blossom...blood red.

      The first Iranian Vampire Western, Ana Lily Amirpour's debut feature A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night basks in the sheer pleasure of pulp. A joyful mash-up of genre, archetype and iconography, its prolific influences span spaghetti westerns, graphic novels, horror films, and the Iranian New Wave. Amped by a mix of Iranian rock, techno and Morricone-inspired riffs, its airy, anamorphic, black-and-white aesthetic and artfully drawn-out scenes combine the simmering tension of Sergio Leone with the surrealism of David Lynch.

    • Vice and Virtue

      Set against the backdrop of the Nazi occupation of France, VICE AND VIRTUE is a stylized retelling of the Marquis de Sade's Justine, as envisioned by one of cinema's most provocative filmmakers Roger Vadim (Blood and Roses, Barbarella). Two sisters navigate very different courses as they struggle to survive within the morally corrupt fascist regime. Juliette (Annie Girardot, The Piano Teacher) is surrounded by the spoils of war, being the mistress of a colonel (Robert Hossein). Meanwhile, Justine (Catherine Deneuve, Repulsion, The Umbrellas of Cherbourg), whose husband is seized by fascists on their wedding day, is taken to a chateau in the country, where she is groomed to become a concubine for the Nazi elite.

    • This Ain't no Mouse Music

      Roots music icon Chris Strachwitz is a detective of sounds, an archaeologist of deep American music, the antithesis of the corporate mouse music that dominates the American ear. Born a German count, Strachwitz fled his homeland after WWII at 16. In the United States he discovered, and shared, a musical landscape that most Americans missed. For the last fifty years, he has carried his tape recorder from sharecrop shacks to roadside honkytonks, from cantina dives to wild Blues clubs. His recordings on his indy label, Arhoolie Records, brought Cajun music out of Louisiana, Tex-Mex out of Texas, Blues out of the country and into the living rooms of the world. These recordings revolutionized the sound of music around the world. Filmmakers Chris Simon and Maureen Gosling join Strachwitz for a hip-shaking stomp from New Orleans to Texas, Cajun country to Appalachia, as he continues his passionate quest for the musical soul of America.

      Directed by Maureen Gosling and Chris Simon

    • Hermia & Helena

      Directed by Matías Piñeiro

      Camila (Agustina Muñoz, The Princess of France), a young Argentine theater director, travels from Buenos Aires to New York for an artist residency to work on a new Spanish translation of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Upon her arrival, she quickly realizes that her work isn't compensating for the loss of her friends and the lover she left behind. When she begins to receive a series of mysterious postcards from Danièle (Mati Diop, Claire Denis’s 35 Shots of Rum), a former participant in the same residency, Camila second-guesses her artistic endeavors and begins to seek answers about her past. Hermia & Helena mingles actors from Matías Piñeiro’s Buenos Aires repertory with stalwarts of New York’s independent film scene (Keith Poulson, Dustin Guy Defa, Dan Sallitt). It is a film of dead ends and new beginnings, navigating amorous detours across hemispheres and languages, in which the words of Shakespeare clash with the entanglements of modern, digital life.

    • Goodbye to Language

      Directed by Jean-Luc Godard

      Winner of the Jury Prize at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival, Goodbye to Language is a triumphant masterpiece from Jean-Luc Godard. Using 3D technology to mind-bending effect, the film follows a couple whose relationship breaks down along with the images, which in its second half takes a dog's-eye view of the world. It is a meditation on history and illusion that creates 3D effects more spectacular than any Hollywood blockbuster, figures merging and weaving across the screen along with the film's ideas about romantic love and being-in-the-world. It has the feeling of a final statement, but knowing Godard's penchant for re-invention, hopefully it is yet another beginning to an extraordinary career.

    • The Fairy

      Dom works as a night clerk at a small hotel in the industrial port city of Le Havre. One night, a strangely dressed woman named Fiona arrives and claims she is a fairy. She grants Dom three wishes, and makes his first two wishes come true before mysteriously vanishing. By now, Dom has fallen in love with Fiona, and he proceeds to embark on a search for his elusive fairy. The third feature film by the gifted trio of physical comedians Dominique Abel, Fiona Gordon, and Bruno Romy, THE FAIRY presents a series of slapstick set pieces which hark back to the work of Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, and Jacques Tati.

      Cast
      The Flying Man Didier Armbruster
      Bartender Bruno Romy
      Dom Dominique Abel
      Fiona Fiona Gordon

      Crew
      Directed by Fiona Gordon, Bruno Romy and Dominique Abel
      Writers Fiona Gordon, Dominique Abel and Bruno Romy
      Produced by Marina Festré (Executive)
      Cinematographer Claire Chidéric
      Art Director Nicolas Girault

    • 5 Broken Cameras

      ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEE - BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
      An extraordinary work of both cinematic and political activism, 5 Broken Cameras is a deeply personal, first-hand account of non-violent resistance in Bil'in, a West Bank village threatened by encroaching Israeli settlements.

      Shot almost entirely by Palestinian farmer Emad Burnat, who bought his first camera in 2005 to record the birth of his youngest son, the footage was later turned into a galvanizing cinematic experience by co-directors Guy Davidi and Burnat.

      Structured around the violent destruction of a succession of Burnat's video cameras, the filmmakers' collaboration follows one family's evolution over five years of village turmoil. Burnat watches from behind the lens as olive trees are bulldozed, protests intensify, and lives are lost. "I feel like the camera protects me," he says, "but it's an illusion."

    • Elles (Unrated)

      A provocative and raw exploration of female sexuality, director Malgoska Szumowska's ELLES paints an unromantic picture of upper-crust domesticity refracted through the vibrant eroticism of prostitution.

      Vacillating between opposing worlds defined alternatively by sexual freedom and constraint, ELLES stars the fearless Juliette Binoche (Chocolat) as Anne, a well-off Parisian journalist investigating the lives of two student prostitutes (Joanna Kulig and Anaïs Demoustier) for a magazine article. What begins as a routine assignment shaped by preconceived notions quickly turns personal, as Anne is drawn into the lives of these fiercely independent young women and forced to confront her own sexual fears and desires.

      A bold examination of poverty and privilege, age and youth, ELLES draws into question the loneliness, sterility, and isolation that plague marital life and stifle sensuality.

      Contains adult content.

    • Finding Fela

      Finding Fela tells the story of Fela Anikulapo Kuti's life, his music, his social and political importance. He created a new musical movement, Afrobeat, using that forum to express his revolutionary political opinions against the dictatorial Nigerian government of the 1970s and 1980s. His influence helped bring a change towards democracy in Nigeria and promoted Pan Africanist politics to the world. The power and potency of Fela's message is completely current today and is expressed in the political movements of oppressed people, embracing Fela's music and message in their struggle for freedom. Directed by Academy Award winning filmmaker Alex Gibney (Taxi To The Dark Side).

    • Who's Crazy

      Accompanied by a frenetic original soundtrack by the great Ornette Coleman, insane asylum inmates escape their confinement and hole up in a deserted Belgian farmhouse, where they cook large quantities of eggs and condemn one of their own in an impromptu court. The actors don’t have much need for words when they can dance around, light things on fire, and drip hot wax on each other instead. Ornette Coleman and the other members of his trio – David Izenzon and Charles Moffett – recorded their score for WHO’S CRAZY? in one go while the film was projected for them, and the result feels like a bizarre silent film with the greatest possible accompaniment. The soundtrack also features a young Marianne Faithfull singing what are probably her most experimental riffs – written for her especially by Ornette – as she asks, “Is God man? Is man God?” in an original track titled “Sadness.”

      WHO’S CRAZY? was long thought to be lost by jazz-on-film scholars and the Library of Congress. In early 2015, the only surviving copy of the film, a 35mm print struck for the film’s debut at Cannes in 1966, was salvaged from director Thomas White’s garage after sitting on a shelf there for decades. Ornette’s soundtrack exists as a hard-to-find LP, but audiences have never before had the opportunity to see what Ornette saw when he composed it. The cast consists of actors from New York’s experimental theater troupe, the Living Theatre, who also performed in Shirley Clarke’s THE CONNECTION; and speaking of connections, Clarke would later direct the fantastic ORNETTE: MADE IN AMERICA (1984). The 35mm print of WHO’S CRAZY? was repaired by John Klacsmann, archivist at Anthology Film Archives.

    • Concerning Violence

      From Göran Hugo Olsson, the director of The Black Power Mixtape comes a bold and fresh visual narrative on Africa, based on newly discovered archive material covering the struggle for liberation from colonial rule in the late '60s and '70s, accompanied by text from Frantz Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth.

    • Memphis

      A strange singer with god given talent drifts through the mythic city of Memphis under its canopy of ancient oak trees, shattered windows, and burning spirituality. Surrounded by lovers, legends, hustlers, preachers, and a wolfpack of kids, the unstable performer avoids the recording studio and is driven to spend time in his own form of self-discovery. Shown in fragments, his journey drags him from love and happiness right to the edge of another dimension.

      Featuring an explosive performance and score from the singular recording artist-cum-wizard, Willis Earl Beal, MEMPHIS is a film steeped in folklore, music, surrealism, and the abstract search for glory.

    • Lumumba

      Made in the tradition of such true-life political thrillers as Malcolm X and JFK, Raoul Peck’s award-winning Lumumba is a gripping epic that dramatizes for the first time the rise and fall of legendary African leader Patrice Lumumba.

      When the Congo declared its independence from Belgium in 1960, the 36-year-old, self-educated Lumumba became the first Prime Minister of the newly independent state. Called "the politico of the bush" by journalists of the day, he became a lightning rod of Cold War politics as his vision of a united Africa gained him powerful enemies in Belgium and the U.S. Lumumba would last just months in office before being brutally assassinated.

      Strikingly photographed in Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Belgium as civil war once again raged in the Congo, the film vividly re-creates the shocking events behind the birth of the country that became Zaire during the reign of Lumumba's former friend and eventual nemesis, Joseph Mobutu.

    • The Trials of Muhammad Ali

      No conventional sports documentary, The Trials Of Muhammad Ali investigates its extraordinary and often complex subject's life outside the boxing ring. From joining the controversial Nation of Islam and changing his name from Cassius Clay to Muhammad Ali, to his refusal to serve in the Vietnam War in the name of protesting racial inequality, to his global humanitarian work, Muhammad Ali remains an inspiring and controversial figure. Outspoken and passionate in his beliefs, Ali found himself in the center of America's controversies over race, religion, and war. From Kartemquin Films - makers of such acclaimed documentaries as Hoop Dreams and The Interrupters - and Academy Award-nominated director Bill Siegel (The Weather Underground), The Trials Of Muhammad Ali examines how one of the most celebrated sports champions of the 20th century risked his fame and fortune to follow his faith and conscience.

      Cast
      Muhammad Ali

      Crew
      Produced by Rachel Pikelny
      Directed by Bill Siegel

    • Charlotte Rampling: The Look

      Legendary actress Charlotte Rampling (Heading South, Melancholia) is "the perfect confluence of brains and beauty" (Time Out NY), and THE LOOK is the entrancing documentary that brings you into intimate contact with both.

    • Love and Anarchy

      An epic tragicomedy from director Lina Wertmuller (Seven Beauties), LOVE AND ANARCHY plumbs the depths of fascist Italy from the perspective of a simple farm boy sent to kill Mussolini.

     
     

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    • Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami

      Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami

      This electrifying journey through the public and private worlds of pop culture mega-icon Grace Jones contrasts musical sequences with intimate personal footage, all the while brimming with Jones’s bold aesthetic.

    • Like Me

      Like Me

      A reckless loner (Addison Timlin, Little Sister) sets out on a crime spree that she broadcasts on social media. After releasing a video of herself robbing a convenience store, she amasses a huge following. While traveling along the coast, she encounters a drifter, an Internet troll, and a paint huffing outsider who are all pulled into her circle of chaos, junk food, and drugs. Robert Mockler’s visually arresting debut feature, produced by indie horror veteran Larry Fessenden, takes the viewer into a world of fabricated personalities and offers a thought-provoking portrait of isolation in our increasingly digital world.

    • The Banishment

      The Banishment

      Andrey Zvyagintsev (Loveless, Leviathan) proffers an ambitious exploration of the human condition in his second feature. Much like his critically acclaimed debut The Return, the film investigates bonds of family, this time tackling the relationship between a husband and wife. A trip to the pastoral countryside reveals a dark, sinister reality for a family from the city. Eschewing easy answers and tackling a wide array of themes, The Banishment poetically renders the persistent human state of exile from our surroundings. Based on the novel The Laughing Matter by William Saroyan.

    • The Return

      The Return

      The debut feature of celebrated director Andrey Zvyagintsev (Loveless, Leviathan) earns its place in the pantheon of great Russian Cinema. Winner of the Golden Lion at the Venice International Film Festival, the film is a mixture of psychological thriller and road movie, telling the story of two young brothers who must cope with the sudden and unexplained return of their father after a 12-year absence. The three embark on a road trip that becomes a background for self-discovery and the destruction of deeply rooted emotional investments. Straightforward yet satisfyingly layered, The Return’s combines deep psychological exploration with bold statements about the trials of manhood.

    • Maximillian and Marie de Bourgogne (miniseries)

      Maximillian and Marie de Bourgogne (miniseries)

      Known as ‘The Last Knight’ for his bravery and battle skills, the great European emperor Maximilian and his story is as spectacular as it is familiar: It is the tale of a boy who must become a man. It is the story of a prince who must learn to be king. But above all, it is the struggle of a son who steps out of his father’s shadow with the help of a most unexpected ally: a beautiful woman every bit as headstrong as the prince himself, held hostage by he own people. Her name: Marie de Bourgogne. Marie and Maximilian’s marriage is much more than

    • Winter Sleep

      Winter Sleep

      Directed by the Turkish cinema master, Nuri Bilge Ceylan, this enthralling, brilliantly photographed film won the top prize at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival and was Turkey's entrant in the Oscar Best Foreign Language Film category. Ceylan's Once Upon a Time in Anatolia had shared the top prize at Cannes in 2011. Set in the amazingly picturesque Cappadocia region in central Turkey, the exterior scenes strikingly capture the remarkable topography a World Heritage site while the interior scenes bring Rembrandt to mind. A retired actor has inherited a small hotel where he is ensconced with his recently divorced sister, his much younger and growingly discontented wife. A seemingly trivial incident sets in motion a drama of personalities at odds with each other and the paths their lives have taken. The superb cast of actors quickly takes your attention and won't let it go.

    • Post Mortem

      Post Mortem

      The second part of director Pablo Larrain's celebrated trilogy about Chile during the dictatorial reign of Augusto Pinochet, POST MORTEM is a "grim, intense, mordantly comic little film" (A.O. Scott, New York Times) about a civil servant transformed by the 1973 military coup.

      Mario (Alfredo Castro, Tony Manero) is an unassuming state employee who transcribes notes during autopsies. Furtive and lonely, he becomes obsessed with his neighbor, the dancehall girl Nancy (Antonia Zegers), who is involved with a group of left-wing activists. With the coup, and the death of President Salvador Allende, Nancy's friends are hunted down, and Mario's hospital becomes clogged with the bodies of dissenters. Soon the violence filters into Mario's psyche, and he begins to break down, much like his country.

      Following the brilliant Tony Manero (2008, available from Kino Lorber), and preceding the recently completed No (2012), Post Mortem is "a new and original vision of political terror" (J. Hoberman, Blouin Art Info) that remains urgently relevant to the repressive regimes of today.

    • Alps

      Alps

      Alps is a mysterious and moving investigation into the process of mourning, a stunningly original follow-up to director Yorgos Lanthimos' Oscar-nominated debut, DOGTOOTH (2009).

      An oddball group of four people (made up of two hospital employees, a gymnast, and her coach) form a secret society that sets out to ease the grieving process for those whose loved ones have died. For a fee they will act the part of the missing family member, learning their hobbies and eccentricities in order to help the customer accept their loss. As methadone is to heroin addiction, so are the Alps, as they call themselves, to the mourning process. But when the nurse known as Monte Rosa (Aggeliki Papoulia, also in DOGTOOTH) begins to attach too deeply to her subjects, their project spirals out of control into violence and confusion.

      Winner of the Best Screenplay Award at the Venice Film Festival, Alps proves that co-writer and director Lanthimos is one of the most talented and provocative filmmakers working today.

    • Winnebago Man

      Winnebago Man

      Type "The Angriest Man in the World" into any search engine, and one name appears -- Jack Rebney, a.k.a. "The Winnebago Man" -- an '80s RV salesman, whose hilarious, profanity-strewn, on-the-job meltdown was captured on video and passed around on VHS tapes, before exploding into an Internet phenomenon seen by millions. When a young filmmaker sets out on the seemingly impossible task of tracking down Rebney, who disappeared 20 years before, he finds Rebney living alone on a mountain top, as sharp-tongued as ever, but more intelligent and loveable than anyone could have imagined. WINNEBAGO MAN is an outrageously funny look at viral culture and an unexpectedly moving tale of one man's response to unintended celebrity.
      Directed by Ben Steinbauer

    • Dawson City: Frozen in Time

      Dawson City: Frozen in Time

      This meditation on cinema’s past from Decasia director Bill Morrison pieces together the bizarre true history of a long-lost collection of 533 nitrate film prints from the early 1900s. Located just south of the Arctic Circle, Dawson City was settled in 1896 and became the center of the Canadian Gold Rush that brought 100,000 prospectors to the area. It was also the final stop for a distribution chain that sent prints and newsreels to the Yukon. The films were seldom, if ever, returned. The now-famous Dawson City Collection was uncovered in 1978 when a bulldozer working its way through a parking lot dug up a horde of film cans. Morrison draws on these permafrost-protected, rare silent films and newsreels, pairing them with archival footage, interviews, historical photographs, and an enigmatic score by Sigur Rós collaborator and composer Alex Somers. Dawson City: Frozen Time depicts the unique history of this Canadian Gold Rush town by chronicling the life cycle of a singular film collection through its exile, burial, rediscovery, and salvation.

      Directed by Bill Morrison
      Writer Bill Morrison
      Editor Bill Morrison
      Cinematographer Bill Morrison
      Produced by Madeleine Molyneaux and Bill Morrison
      Composed by Alex Somers
      Sound John Somers

    • It Felt Like Love

      It Felt Like Love

      In this unflinchingly honest and refreshingly unsentimental coming-of-age story, 14-year-old Lila (Gina Piersanti, in a remarkable debut) spends a languid South Brooklyn summer playing third wheel to her promiscuous friend Chiara and Chiara's boyfriend Patrick. Eager for her own sexual awakening, Lila gamely decides to pursue the older, thuggish Sammy, rumored to sleep with anyone. But as Lila's overt advances unmask her inexperience and quiet desperation, she is quickly pushed into frightening and unwelcome new territory.

    • Harvard Beats Yale 29-29

      Harvard Beats Yale 29-29

      An incredible true story that unfolds like "a ripping good yarn... with an uproarious, impossible Hollywood ending" (Andrew O'Hehir, Salon.com), Harvard Beats Yale 29-29 is filmmaker Kevin Rafferty's (The Atomic Cafe) acclaimed documentary depicting one of the most legendary games in the history of sports.

    • Sidewalk Stories

      Sidewalk Stories

      A young artist living in New York, on the fringes of the financial district and its rushing crowds, tries to make a living sketching passers-by on the street. He survives on his meager means and has found refuge in an abandoned building. One night, on the corner of a back alley, he finds a little girl whose father has just been murdered. While struggling to take care of her, he meets a young rich woman who immediately falls in love with this awkward couple.

    • Hitler's Hollywood

      Hitler's Hollywood

      Filmmaker Rüdiger Suchsland suggests that the Third Reich was essentially an immersive movie starring the German nation, produced and directed by Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels. Hitler’s Hollywood collages key films from the more than 1000 features the Nazis produced from 1933-1945: musicals, melodramas, romances, costume dramas, war films – and when the real war got tough, insanely lavish, over-the-top fantasies.

    • Who is Dayani Cristal?

      Who is Dayani Cristal?

      The body of an unidentified immigrant is found in the Arizona Desert. In an attempt to retrace his path and discover his story, director Marc Silver and Gael Garcia Bernal embed themselves among migrant travelers on their own mission to cross the border, providing rare insight into the human stories which are so often ignored in the immigration debate.

    • Manuscripts Don't Burn

      Manuscripts Don't Burn

      Clandestinely produced in disavowal of a 20-year filmmaking ban passed down by the Iranian authorities, the scathing Manuscripts Don't Burn brings a whole new level of clarity and audacity to Mohommad Rasoulof's already laudable career. Drawing from the true story of the government's attempted 1995 murder of several prominent writers and intellectuals, Rasoulof imagines a repressive regime so pervasive that even the morally righteous are subsumed or cast aside. A lacerating and slow-burning thriller filmed in a frigid palate of blues and greys, Manuscripts Don't Burn is perhaps the most subversive and incendiary j'accuse lodged against an authoritarian regime since the fall of the Soviet Union.

    • Computer Chess

      Computer Chess

      Set over the course of a weekend tournament for chess software programmers thirty-some years ago, COMPUTER CHESS transports viewers to a nostalgic moment when the contest between technology and the human spirit seemed a little more up for grabs. We get to know the eccentric geniuses possessed of the vision to teach a metal box to defeat man, literally, at his own game, laying the groundwork for artificial intelligence as we know it and will come to know it in the future.

    • Deceptive Practice: The Mysteries and Mentors of Ricky Jay

      Deceptive Practice: The Mysteries and Mentors of Ricky Jay

      Ricky Jay is a world-renowned magician, author, historian and actor (often a mischievous presence in the films of David Mamet and Paul Thomas Anderson) -- and a performer who regularly provokes astonishment from even the most jaded audiences. DECEPTIVE PRACTICE traces Jay's achievements and influences, from his apprenticeship at age 4 with his grandfather, to such now-forgotten legends as Al Flosso, Slydini, Cardini and his primary mentors, Dai Vernon and Charlie Miller. Featuring rare footage from his 1970s TV appearances (doing 3-card Monte with Steve Martin on The Dinah Shore Show) and told in Jay's inimitable voice, this is a remarkable journey inside the secretive world of magic and the small circle of eccentrics who are its perpetual devotees.

    • Gerhard Richter Painting

      Gerhard Richter Painting

      GERHARD RICHTER PAINTING offers unprecedented insight into the life and work of one of the greatest artists of our time, and is a "gorgeously rendered work of art" (Variety) in its own right.

      Legendary German painter Gerhard Richter granted filmmaker Corinna Belz access to his studio in the spring and summer of 2009, where he was working on a series of large abstract paintings. In quiet, highly concentrated images, the documentary provides a fly-on-the-wall perspective of the very personal, tension-filled process of artistic creation. Richter is his own worst critic, destroying multiple canvases before his remarkable creative spirit takes hold, and the astonishing final compositions emerge.

      "Painting is another form of thinking," Richter once said, and GERHARD RICHTER PAINTING takes that premise seriously, exposing for the first time how he translates his thoughts onto a blank canvas. Beautifully shot and endlessly revealing, it "artfully and convincingly immerses us into the world of one of the greatest [painters], painting." (Village Voice)

    • Down Down the Deep River

      Down Down the Deep River

      Down Down The Deep River marks the directorial debut of Will Sheff, lead singer and songwriter for Okkervil River. Shot in Sheff’s hometown over one year with local non-actors, the dreamy, dialogue-free short film is a story of childhood, imagination, alienation, and loss as two young boys form a friendship and spur the unfolding strange events in 1980s small town New Hampshire.

      Impeccable art direction brings magic to nostalgic, dreamlike, fictionalized representations of Sheff’s own childhood memories, filtering them through the aesthetics of the cornerstone children’s fantasy films of the era — E.T., Explorers, and The Goonies to name a few.

      Sheff scored the film to a musical landscape drawn from his band’s song “Down Down the Deep River” from their 2013 album The Silver Gymnasium.

    • Porto

      Porto

      Jake (Anton Yelchin) and Mati (Lucie Lucas) are two expats who experience a brief but intimate connection in the ancient Portuguese city of Porto. He's an American loner exiled from his family. She’s a student from France embroiled in an affair with one of her professors. After spotting each other from a distance at an archeological site and then again at a train station and a café, Jake works up the courage to approach Mati and they embark on a night of carefree intimacy. This romantic encounter is viewed from years later, both characters still haunted by the powerful connection they shared. Using a mix of film stocks and art direction that evokes a bygone era of European cinema, Porto delivers a cinematic form of saudade – a Portuguese word that describes an emotional state of nostalgic longing for a person or place that one has loved.

    • The Forbidden Room

      The Forbidden Room

      THE FORBIDDEN ROOM is Guy Maddin's ultimate epic phantasmagoria. Honoring classic cinema while electrocuting it with energy, this Russian nesting doll of a film begins (after a prologue on how to take a bath) with the crew of a doomed submarine chewing flapjacks in a desperate attempt to breathe the oxygen within. Suddenly, impossibly, a lost woodsman wanders into their company and tells his tale of escaping from a fearsome clan of cave dwellers. From here, Maddin and co-director Evan Johnson take us high into the air, around the world, and into dreamscapes, spinning tales of amnesia, captivity, deception and murder, skeleton women and vampire bananas. Playing like some glorious meeting between Italo Calvino, Sergei Eisenstein and a perverted six year-old child, THE FORBIDDEN ROOM is Maddin's grand ode to lost cinema. Created with the help of master poet John Ashbery, the film features Mathieu Amalric, Udo Kier, Charlotte Rampling, Geraldine Chaplin, Roy Dupuis, Clara Furey, Louis Negin, Maria de Medeiros, Jacques Nolot, Adele Haenel, Amira Casar and Elina Lowensohn as a cavalcade of misfits, thieves and lovers, all joined in the joyful delirium of the kaleidoscopic viewing experience.

    • Oldboy

      Oldboy

      After being kidnapped and imprisoned for 15 years, Oh Dae-Su is released, only to find that he must find his captor in 5 days.

    • Romanzo Criminale (Complete Series)

      Romanzo Criminale (Complete Series)

      A criminal known as Lebanese has a dream: to conquer the underworld of Rome. To carry out this feat without precedent he puts together a ruthless and highly organized gang. Their progress and changes in leadership (Lebanese is followed by his cohorts Freddo and Dandi) take place over twenty-five years, from the 1970's into the '90's, and are inseparably intertwined with the dark history of modern Italy: terrorism, kidnappings and corruption at the highest levels of government. Throughout these years Police Lieutenant Scialoia sticks to the gang's trail, trying both to bring them to justice and to win the heart of Dandi's girlfriend Patrizia.

    • Dead Weight

      Dead Weight

      Charlie Russell passes through the wilderness in the wake of an apocalyptic viral outbreak to reunite with his girlfriend, Samantha. As Charlie's journey brings him closer to his destination of Wausau, WI, he must face physical exhaustion, malicious survivors, and perhaps most menacing, his own emotional burdens. With his newfound traveling companions Charlie must attempt to break his obsessions with the past. He must learn to let it go.

    • Bethlehem

      Bethlehem

      Bethlehem tells the story of the complex relationship between an Israeli Secret Service officer and his teenage Palestinian informant. Shuttling back and forth between conflicting points of view, the film is a raw portrayal of characters torn apart by competing loyalties and impossible moral dilemmas, giving an unparalleled glimpse into the dark and fascinating world of human intelligence.

    • Dogtooth

      Dogtooth

      DOGTOOTH is an ingenious dark comedy that won the Prix Un Certain Regard at the 2009 Cannes Film Festival, propelling Yorgos Lanthimos to the forefront of contemporary cinema's most ambitious young filmmakers.

    • Burning Bush (Miniseries)

      Burning Bush (Miniseries)

      Acclaimed director Agnieszka Holland (Europa, Europa) returns to a pivotal time in modern Czech history: the shocking act of a student of the Charles University's Faculty of Arts, who in protest of the Soviet occupation, set himself on fire in Prague's Wenceslas Square on the 16th of January 1969, and died four days later.

    • Omar

      Omar

      Omar is accustomed to dodging surveillance bullets to cross the separation wall to visit his secret love Nadia. But occupied Palestine knows neither simple love nor clear-cut war. On the other side of the wall, the sensitive young baker Omar becomes a freedom fighter who must face painful choices about life and manhood. When Omar is captured after a deadly act of resistance, he falls into a cat-and-mouse game with the military police. Suspicion and betrayal jeopardize his longtime trust with accomplices and childhood friends Amjad and Tarek, Nadia's militant brother. Omar's feelings quickly become as torn apart as the Palestinian landscape. But it's soon evident that everything he does is for his love of Nadia.

    • Stanley Kubrick's Fear and Desire

      Stanley Kubrick's Fear and Desire

      Virtually unseen since its theatrical premiere in 1953, FEAR AND DESIRE was the ambitious first feature film by legendary filmmaker Stanley Kubrick. An existential war film often compared with the director's PATHS OF GLORY (1957) and FULL METAL JACKET (1987), FEAR AND DESIRE follows a squad of soldiers who have crash-landed behind enemy lines and must work their way downriver to rejoin their unit. In the process, they encounter a peasant girl (Virginia Leith) and bind her to a tree, where she is tormented by a mentally unbalanced soldier (future director Paul Mazursky). Before making their escape, the soldiers determine the location of an enemy base and formulate a plot to assassinate its commanding officer.

      The film has been restored at the Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Virginia, from first-generation film elements. Also included on this disc is Kubrick's documentary short THE SEAFARERS, newly preserved by The Museum of Modern Art, with support from The Film Foundation and The Franco-American Cultural Fund.

    • More Than Honey

      More Than Honey

      Oscar-nominated director Markus Imhoof (The Boat is Full) tackles the vexing issue of why bees, worldwide, are facing extinction. With the tenacity of a man out to solve a world-class mystery, he investigates this global phenomenon, from California to Switzerland, China and Australia. Exquisite macro-photography of the bees (reminiscent of Microcosmos) in flight and in their hives reveals a fascinating, complex world in crisis.

      Writes Eric Kohn in Indiewire: "Imhoof captures the breeding of queen bees in minute detail, ventures to a laboratory to witness a bee brainscan, and discovers the dangerous prospects of a hive facing the infection of mites. In this latter case, the camera's magnifying power renders the infection in sci-fi terms, as if we've stumbled into a discarded scene from David Cronenberg's The Fly." This is a strange and strangely moving film that raises questions of species survival in cosmic as well as apiary terms.

    • You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet

      You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet

      Based on two works by the playwright Jean Anouilh, YOU AIN'T SEEN NOTHIN' YET opens with a who's-who of French acting royalty (including Mathieu Amalric, Michel Piccoli and frequent Resnais muse Sabine Azema) being summoned to the reading of a late playwright's last will and testament.

      There, the playwright (Denis Podalydes) appears on a TV screen from beyond the grave and asks his erstwhile collaborators to evaluate a recording of an experimental theater company performing his Eurydice--a play they themselves all appeared in over the years. But as the video unspools, instead of watching passively, these seasoned thespians begin acting out the text alongside their youthful avatars, looking back into the past rather like mythic Orpheus himself.

      Gorgeously shot by cinematographer Eric Gautier on stylized sets that recall the French poetic realism of the 1930s, YOU AIN'T SEEN NOTHIN' YET is an alternately wry and wistful valentine to actors and the art of performance from a director long fascinated by the intersection of life, theater and cinema.

    • Sister

      Sister

      Simon (Kacey Mottet Klein) lives with his older sister (Lea Seydoux) in a housing complex below a luxury Swiss ski resort. With his sister drifting in and out of jobs and relationships, twelve-year-old Simon takes on the responsibility of providing for the two of them. Every day, he takes the lift up to the opulent ski world above, stealing equipment from rich tourists to resell to the local kids down in the valley. He is able to keep their little family afloat with his small-time hustles and his sister is thankful for the money he brings in. But, when Simon partners with a crooked British seasonal worker, he begins to lose his boundaries, affecting his relationship with his sister and plummeting him into dangerous territory.

    • Blood Car

      Blood Car

      In the all-too-foreseeable future, gas prices approach $40 a gallon, causing some Americans to abandon their vehicles and others to seek alternate sources of fuel. When a mild-mannered schoolteacher (Mike Brune) invents an experimental engine that thrives on blood, he attracts the attention of two women who vie for his affection: Denise (Katie Rowlett), the proprietress of a butcher stand, and Lorraine (Anna Chlumsky) who runs a rival veggie stand in a grim urban landscape. But Archies need for speed soon surpasses his body's ability to regenerate fluids, so he takes desperate measures to satisfy the Blood Car's thirst. Veering between wicked social satire and outbursts of hardcore gore, BLOOD CAR lives up to its reputation as an "audacious utterly bonkers and downright sick claret-drenched black comedy" Time Out London.

    • Pig

      Pig

      PIG is a mind-bending sci-fi thriller in the tradition of Mement, "a riveting adventure of confusion and Identity" (Cleveland Plain Dealer).

      A man (Rudolf Martin, NCIS) wakes up alone in the middle of the desert with a black hood on his head and his hands tied behind his back. He has no idea who he is or how he got there. The only clue to his identity- -a piece of paper in his pocket with the name "Manny Elder" written on it--sends him to Los Angeles where things are not what they seem and clues lead to something bigger and more unusual than he could have ever imagined.

      A wildly entertaining shocker that has won festival awards around the world - PIG is a classic in the making.

    • Back in Crime

      Back in Crime

      When Paris detective Richard Kemp (Jean-Hugues Anglade) is injured in the course of a criminal investigation, he is transported twenty years into the past, and has a second chance at solving the most frustrating mystery of his career: a serial killer known as the Earwig. In pursuing the Earwig, Richard enlists the aid of a beautiful psychologist (Mélanie Thierry), who has doubts about the time-traveler's sanity. But as Richard attempts to rewrite history, the killer's path begins to take unexpected turns, confounding Richard's investigation, and rendering his own future uncertain.

    • The Force

      The Force

      "Sprawling, immediate, and complex, Peter Nicks’s vérité documentary moves like a pulsing, timely thriller. In 2014, after over a decade of federal monitoring for misconduct and civil rights abuses, the Oakland Police Department hires Chief Sean Whent … in hopes of bridging an historically tense divide between its officers and the community they serve. The Force captures everything; it hovers over Oakland’s evening skies and rides inside speeding police vehicles, granting viewers breathless firsthand access to some of law enforcement’s most dangerous jobs. With fly-on-the-wall intimacy, we see a department trapped in transition, desperate to shed its corrupt image but also challenged by an increasingly organized and urgent Black Lives Matter movement erupting right outside its doorstep." – Harry Vaughn, Sundance Film Festival.

      Directed by Peter Nicks

    • The Retrieval

      The Retrieval

      On the outskirts of the Civil War, The Retrieval follows a fatherless 13 year-old boy sent north by his bounty hunter gang on a dangerous mission to retrieve a wanted man under false pretense. During their journey towards the unwitting man’s reckoning, the initially distant pair develops unexpected bonds. As his feelings grow, the boy is consumed by conflicting emotions and a gut-wrenching ultimate decision: betray the father figure he’s finally found or risk being killed by his gang for insubordination.

    • A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night

      A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night

      Strange things are afoot in Bad City. The Iranian ghost town, home to prostitutes, junkies, pimps, and other sordid souls, is a place that reeks of death and hopelessness, where a lonely vampire is stalking the towns most unsavory inhabitants. But when boy meets girl, an unusual love story begins to blossom...blood red.

      The first Iranian Vampire Western, Ana Lily Amirpour's debut feature A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night basks in the sheer pleasure of pulp. A joyful mash-up of genre, archetype and iconography, its prolific influences span spaghetti westerns, graphic novels, horror films, and the Iranian New Wave. Amped by a mix of Iranian rock, techno and Morricone-inspired riffs, its airy, anamorphic, black-and-white aesthetic and artfully drawn-out scenes combine the simmering tension of Sergio Leone with the surrealism of David Lynch.

    • Vice and Virtue

      Vice and Virtue

      Set against the backdrop of the Nazi occupation of France, VICE AND VIRTUE is a stylized retelling of the Marquis de Sade's Justine, as envisioned by one of cinema's most provocative filmmakers Roger Vadim (Blood and Roses, Barbarella). Two sisters navigate very different courses as they struggle to survive within the morally corrupt fascist regime. Juliette (Annie Girardot, The Piano Teacher) is surrounded by the spoils of war, being the mistress of a colonel (Robert Hossein). Meanwhile, Justine (Catherine Deneuve, Repulsion, The Umbrellas of Cherbourg), whose husband is seized by fascists on their wedding day, is taken to a chateau in the country, where she is groomed to become a concubine for the Nazi elite.

    • This Ain't no Mouse Music

      This Ain't no Mouse Music

      Roots music icon Chris Strachwitz is a detective of sounds, an archaeologist of deep American music, the antithesis of the corporate mouse music that dominates the American ear. Born a German count, Strachwitz fled his homeland after WWII at 16. In the United States he discovered, and shared, a musical landscape that most Americans missed. For the last fifty years, he has carried his tape recorder from sharecrop shacks to roadside honkytonks, from cantina dives to wild Blues clubs. His recordings on his indy label, Arhoolie Records, brought Cajun music out of Louisiana, Tex-Mex out of Texas, Blues out of the country and into the living rooms of the world. These recordings revolutionized the sound of music around the world. Filmmakers Chris Simon and Maureen Gosling join Strachwitz for a hip-shaking stomp from New Orleans to Texas, Cajun country to Appalachia, as he continues his passionate quest for the musical soul of America.

      Directed by Maureen Gosling and Chris Simon

    • Hermia & Helena

      Hermia & Helena

      Directed by Matías Piñeiro

      Camila (Agustina Muñoz, The Princess of France), a young Argentine theater director, travels from Buenos Aires to New York for an artist residency to work on a new Spanish translation of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Upon her arrival, she quickly realizes that her work isn't compensating for the loss of her friends and the lover she left behind. When she begins to receive a series of mysterious postcards from Danièle (Mati Diop, Claire Denis’s 35 Shots of Rum), a former participant in the same residency, Camila second-guesses her artistic endeavors and begins to seek answers about her past. Hermia & Helena mingles actors from Matías Piñeiro’s Buenos Aires repertory with stalwarts of New York’s independent film scene (Keith Poulson, Dustin Guy Defa, Dan Sallitt). It is a film of dead ends and new beginnings, navigating amorous detours across hemispheres and languages, in which the words of Shakespeare clash with the entanglements of modern, digital life.

    • Goodbye to Language

      Goodbye to Language

      Directed by Jean-Luc Godard

      Winner of the Jury Prize at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival, Goodbye to Language is a triumphant masterpiece from Jean-Luc Godard. Using 3D technology to mind-bending effect, the film follows a couple whose relationship breaks down along with the images, which in its second half takes a dog's-eye view of the world. It is a meditation on history and illusion that creates 3D effects more spectacular than any Hollywood blockbuster, figures merging and weaving across the screen along with the film's ideas about romantic love and being-in-the-world. It has the feeling of a final statement, but knowing Godard's penchant for re-invention, hopefully it is yet another beginning to an extraordinary career.

    • The Fairy

      The Fairy

      Dom works as a night clerk at a small hotel in the industrial port city of Le Havre. One night, a strangely dressed woman named Fiona arrives and claims she is a fairy. She grants Dom three wishes, and makes his first two wishes come true before mysteriously vanishing. By now, Dom has fallen in love with Fiona, and he proceeds to embark on a search for his elusive fairy. The third feature film by the gifted trio of physical comedians Dominique Abel, Fiona Gordon, and Bruno Romy, THE FAIRY presents a series of slapstick set pieces which hark back to the work of Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, and Jacques Tati.

      Cast
      The Flying Man Didier Armbruster
      Bartender Bruno Romy
      Dom Dominique Abel
      Fiona Fiona Gordon

      Crew
      Directed by Fiona Gordon, Bruno Romy and Dominique Abel
      Writers Fiona Gordon, Dominique Abel and Bruno Romy
      Produced by Marina Festré (Executive)
      Cinematographer Claire Chidéric
      Art Director Nicolas Girault

    • 5 Broken Cameras

      5 Broken Cameras

      ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEE - BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
      An extraordinary work of both cinematic and political activism, 5 Broken Cameras is a deeply personal, first-hand account of non-violent resistance in Bil'in, a West Bank village threatened by encroaching Israeli settlements.

      Shot almost entirely by Palestinian farmer Emad Burnat, who bought his first camera in 2005 to record the birth of his youngest son, the footage was later turned into a galvanizing cinematic experience by co-directors Guy Davidi and Burnat.

      Structured around the violent destruction of a succession of Burnat's video cameras, the filmmakers' collaboration follows one family's evolution over five years of village turmoil. Burnat watches from behind the lens as olive trees are bulldozed, protests intensify, and lives are lost. "I feel like the camera protects me," he says, "but it's an illusion."

    • Elles (Unrated)

      Elles (Unrated)

      A provocative and raw exploration of female sexuality, director Malgoska Szumowska's ELLES paints an unromantic picture of upper-crust domesticity refracted through the vibrant eroticism of prostitution.

      Vacillating between opposing worlds defined alternatively by sexual freedom and constraint, ELLES stars the fearless Juliette Binoche (Chocolat) as Anne, a well-off Parisian journalist investigating the lives of two student prostitutes (Joanna Kulig and Anaïs Demoustier) for a magazine article. What begins as a routine assignment shaped by preconceived notions quickly turns personal, as Anne is drawn into the lives of these fiercely independent young women and forced to confront her own sexual fears and desires.

      A bold examination of poverty and privilege, age and youth, ELLES draws into question the loneliness, sterility, and isolation that plague marital life and stifle sensuality.

      Contains adult content.

    • Finding Fela

      Finding Fela

      Finding Fela tells the story of Fela Anikulapo Kuti's life, his music, his social and political importance. He created a new musical movement, Afrobeat, using that forum to express his revolutionary political opinions against the dictatorial Nigerian government of the 1970s and 1980s. His influence helped bring a change towards democracy in Nigeria and promoted Pan Africanist politics to the world. The power and potency of Fela's message is completely current today and is expressed in the political movements of oppressed people, embracing Fela's music and message in their struggle for freedom. Directed by Academy Award winning filmmaker Alex Gibney (Taxi To The Dark Side).

    • Who's Crazy

      Who's Crazy

      Accompanied by a frenetic original soundtrack by the great Ornette Coleman, insane asylum inmates escape their confinement and hole up in a deserted Belgian farmhouse, where they cook large quantities of eggs and condemn one of their own in an impromptu court. The actors don’t have much need for words when they can dance around, light things on fire, and drip hot wax on each other instead. Ornette Coleman and the other members of his trio – David Izenzon and Charles Moffett – recorded their score for WHO’S CRAZY? in one go while the film was projected for them, and the result feels like a bizarre silent film with the greatest possible accompaniment. The soundtrack also features a young Marianne Faithfull singing what are probably her most experimental riffs – written for her especially by Ornette – as she asks, “Is God man? Is man God?” in an original track titled “Sadness.”

      WHO’S CRAZY? was long thought to be lost by jazz-on-film scholars and the Library of Congress. In early 2015, the only surviving copy of the film, a 35mm print struck for the film’s debut at Cannes in 1966, was salvaged from director Thomas White’s garage after sitting on a shelf there for decades. Ornette’s soundtrack exists as a hard-to-find LP, but audiences have never before had the opportunity to see what Ornette saw when he composed it. The cast consists of actors from New York’s experimental theater troupe, the Living Theatre, who also performed in Shirley Clarke’s THE CONNECTION; and speaking of connections, Clarke would later direct the fantastic ORNETTE: MADE IN AMERICA (1984). The 35mm print of WHO’S CRAZY? was repaired by John Klacsmann, archivist at Anthology Film Archives.

    • Concerning Violence

      Concerning Violence

      From Göran Hugo Olsson, the director of The Black Power Mixtape comes a bold and fresh visual narrative on Africa, based on newly discovered archive material covering the struggle for liberation from colonial rule in the late '60s and '70s, accompanied by text from Frantz Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth.

    • Memphis

      Memphis

      A strange singer with god given talent drifts through the mythic city of Memphis under its canopy of ancient oak trees, shattered windows, and burning spirituality. Surrounded by lovers, legends, hustlers, preachers, and a wolfpack of kids, the unstable performer avoids the recording studio and is driven to spend time in his own form of self-discovery. Shown in fragments, his journey drags him from love and happiness right to the edge of another dimension.

      Featuring an explosive performance and score from the singular recording artist-cum-wizard, Willis Earl Beal, MEMPHIS is a film steeped in folklore, music, surrealism, and the abstract search for glory.

    • Lumumba

      Lumumba

      Made in the tradition of such true-life political thrillers as Malcolm X and JFK, Raoul Peck’s award-winning Lumumba is a gripping epic that dramatizes for the first time the rise and fall of legendary African leader Patrice Lumumba.

      When the Congo declared its independence from Belgium in 1960, the 36-year-old, self-educated Lumumba became the first Prime Minister of the newly independent state. Called "the politico of the bush" by journalists of the day, he became a lightning rod of Cold War politics as his vision of a united Africa gained him powerful enemies in Belgium and the U.S. Lumumba would last just months in office before being brutally assassinated.

      Strikingly photographed in Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Belgium as civil war once again raged in the Congo, the film vividly re-creates the shocking events behind the birth of the country that became Zaire during the reign of Lumumba's former friend and eventual nemesis, Joseph Mobutu.

    • The Trials of Muhammad Ali

      The Trials of Muhammad Ali

      No conventional sports documentary, The Trials Of Muhammad Ali investigates its extraordinary and often complex subject's life outside the boxing ring. From joining the controversial Nation of Islam and changing his name from Cassius Clay to Muhammad Ali, to his refusal to serve in the Vietnam War in the name of protesting racial inequality, to his global humanitarian work, Muhammad Ali remains an inspiring and controversial figure. Outspoken and passionate in his beliefs, Ali found himself in the center of America's controversies over race, religion, and war. From Kartemquin Films - makers of such acclaimed documentaries as Hoop Dreams and The Interrupters - and Academy Award-nominated director Bill Siegel (The Weather Underground), The Trials Of Muhammad Ali examines how one of the most celebrated sports champions of the 20th century risked his fame and fortune to follow his faith and conscience.

      Cast
      Muhammad Ali

      Crew
      Produced by Rachel Pikelny
      Directed by Bill Siegel

    • Charlotte Rampling: The Look

      Charlotte Rampling: The Look

      Legendary actress Charlotte Rampling (Heading South, Melancholia) is "the perfect confluence of brains and beauty" (Time Out NY), and THE LOOK is the entrancing documentary that brings you into intimate contact with both.

    • Love and Anarchy

      Love and Anarchy

      An epic tragicomedy from director Lina Wertmuller (Seven Beauties), LOVE AND ANARCHY plumbs the depths of fascist Italy from the perspective of a simple farm boy sent to kill Mussolini.